Scruffy’s Cadbury Egg Disaster: A Case for Training Dogs to Sit Politely Instead of Counter-Surfing

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Written by Dr. Yin in 2009, this article covers the dangers of those holiday snacks we often leave out for friends and family. And, unintentionally, for a rambunctious pet with a finely tuned nose. Although the tasty candy here was chocolate eggs, Halloween and Christmas also feature dangerous, delicious chocolate.
For most pet parents, having a dog that’s well trained would be nice but doesn’t seem like a necessity. This is especially true if the dog spends most of his time in familiar places—such as the home, or the yard, or just on short walks in the neighborhood. He may be so used to the scene that he never gets excited enough or distracted enough to be bothersome. It turns out that you can’t count on life being so mundane. One family found this out the expensive way when their Holiday house plan went awry.

Win a Free Nerdbook!

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Enter to win a free copy of “The Small Animal Veterinary Nerdbook”. Over 35,000 veterinarians and vet students own this handy veterinary reference book. They’ve used it to help them through classes, board exams, clinical rotations, and their first years in practice. Now YOU can win a FREE copy of your own.

Pet Holiday Hazards that Can Ambush Your Furry Friend

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The Holiday Season is always filled with unexpected expenses. Like monsoons in Manilla, you never know exactly when and how one’s going to hit. Will it be more gift-giving than planned or higher heating costs than last year? Well, if you’re an out-of-luck pet owner, it could be a surprise veterinary bill, because believe it or not, the season to be jolly also doubles as the season for Spot to visit the vet-on emergency.

Onions and Dogs: A Lethal Combination

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While many of you already know that chocolate can make your cat or dog sick, did you know that onions can kill? I learned this my second year in veterinary school. But I didn’t really appreciate it until the big onion incident that occurred during my senior year. Well, maybe the incident wasn’t all that big; it only involved one dog. But it was my own dog, Max, a 72-pound adult Boxer. And it nearly killed him.